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Cooking Class Flyer - June 28th


 Beat the heat

IDPH Offers Tips To Avoid Tickborne Illness

SPRINGFIELD – As the weather warms up, more ticks are starting to appear.  Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) Director Nirav D. Shah, M.D., J.D., reminds residents about the importance of taking precautions against tick bites and the diseases they carry.

“Ticks can carry diseases like Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and ehrlichiosis,” said Director Shah.  “A bite from a tick can cause anywhere from mild to severe illness, and even death in some cases, so it is important to protect yourself against bites.”

Many tickborne diseases have similar symptoms.  The most common symptoms of tick-related illnesses can include fever, chills, aches and pains, and rash.  Within two weeks following a tick bite, if you experience a rash that looks like a bull’s-eye or a rash anywhere on your body, or an unexplained illness accompanied by fever, contact your doctor.  Early recognition and treatment of the infection decreases the risk of serious complications.  Tell your health care provider the geographic area in which you were bitten to help identify the disease based on ticks in that region.

Ticks are commonly found on the tips of grasses and shrubs.  Ticks crawl?they cannot fly or jump.  The tick will wait in the grass or shrub for a person or animal to walk by and then quickly climb aboard.  Some ticks will attach quickly and others will wander, looking for places like the ear, or other areas where the skin is thinner.

Simple tips to avoid ticks bites include:

• Wear light-colored, protective clothing—long-sleeved shirts, pants, boots or sturdy shoes, and a head covering.  Treat clothing with products containing 0.5 percent permethrin. 
• Apply insect repellent that contains 20 percent or more DEET, picaridin, or IR3535 on exposed skin for protection that lasts several hours.
• Walk in the center of trails so grass, shrubs, and weeds do not brush against you.
• Check yourself, children, other family members, and pets for ticks every two to three hours.
• Remove any tick promptly by grasping it with tweezers, as close to the skin as possible and gently, but firmly, pulling it straight out.  Wash your hands and the tick bite site with soap and water.

Find more information at on the IDPH website

Family Preparedness Plans Must Include Pets

IEMA, local emergency management agencies to focus on pet preparedness throughout June

SPRINGFIELD – Pets are cherished family members in many Illinois homes, so it’s important for pet owners to have plans to keep their pets safe during and after emergencies. Throughout National Pet Preparedness Month in June, the Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) and local emergency management agencies will provide tips and information on pet emergency preparedness.

“More than half of homes in Illinois have at least one pet,” said IEMA Director James K. Joseph. “Emergency situations can be very stressful, particularly for pets who don’t understand what is happening. If your family includes a dog, cat, hamster or other furry, feathered or scaly friends, don’t forget to include their unique needs in your home emergency plans.”

Joseph said home emergency supply kits for people should include a three-day supply of such items as food, water, first aid kit, weather alert radio, flashlights, spare batteries and other items. Pet owners should also have a pet preparedness kit stocked with items such as:

  • At least a three-day supply of food and water
  • Extra supplies of pet medicines
  • Copies of pet registration, vaccinations and other important documents
  • Photo of your pet in case you are separated during an emergency
  • Collar with ID tag, harness or leash
  • Crate or other pet carrier in case of evacuation
  • Pet litter and box, newspapers, paper towels, plastic trash bags and household chlorine bleach for sanitation
  • Toys, treats or other familiar items to reduce your pet’s stress during the emergency

A disaster may require you to evacuate your home, sometimes with little notice. It’s important to take pets with you, as an evacuation could last several days, even weeks, and your pets likely cannot survive without care. Plan now for places you and your pets can stay following an evacuation, as many public shelters do not allow animals inside.

It’s also important to have a back-up emergency plan in case you can’t care for or evacuate your animals yourself. Talk to neighbors, friends and family to make sure someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so.

Additional pet preparedness and general emergency preparedness information is available on the Ready Illinois website at www.Ready.Illinois.gov, the Ready Illinois Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ReadyIllinois and on Twitter at Twitter.com/ReadyIllinois.

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Tuesday the 27th.